STANDING IN THE MIDDLE OF THE STORM

How does it feel to live in a devastating conflict? Where everyone is mainly concerned about his safety, and his essential demands in life! How does it feel if your country started to fall apart as soon as you started building your future?

[The] war in Syria has destroyed all sectors of life, including education and scientific research. Taking into consideration that scientific research had no previous solid ground in Syria. The crisis imposed serious obstacles in front of the newly spinning wheel of research. However, it provoked the elaboration of the utmost of the students’ abilities; their ability to adapt and even to create their own academic- research learning environment. Hoping to light up the candle of research in Syria.

workshop

An important workshops conducted by faculty of medicine, Damascus University for the first time, and by a group of students who work on Cochrane reviews.

An important workshops conducted by faculty of medicine, Damascus University for the first time, and by a group of students who work on Cochrane reviews.

The curriculum, a baseline not a supporting framework:

The curriculum at medical school sets only the basics acquired in research field. It does not qualify a fully- equipped researcher. But this is not something to stop us! The internet with its open resources and particularly the massive open online courses (MOOCs) constitutes a fundamental educational resource for every student who is interested in research. Adding to this, students here support and help to fill the gaps of knowledge of each other by leading peer groups. Many workshops are held at the university [1] and informative materials are shared by means of social media where medical students showed great work-spirit and mutuality. We can say with confidence, the seed of a Syrian scientific research community has started to grow despite of the surrounding darkness and soon will bear its fruits.

About the authors:

Sarah Zaher Addeen

Sarah is a senior year student at Faculty of Medicine, Damascus University. She was born and lives in Sweida, Syria. Sarah is a first aider and resuscitation provider. She is passionate about medicine, especially neuroscience. She wants to become a clinician as well as a researcher. She believes that education and strengthening youth potentials are the keys to create a better future for Syria. She is also concerned about women education and empowering in third- world countries. Sarah may be reached at sarah.zaheraddeen@gmail.com.

Fatima Abbas

Fatima was born in Damascus. She is a senior year student at Faculty of Medicine, Damascus University. Fatima is a member in Cochrane training network, she is leader of academic projects at Ahyaha, and an educator. She leads research projects in MyDoctor initiative. She is interested in developing research community in Syria, she has an ambition to support the education process for Syrian students and to improve health care in Syria. In her opinion, Health, education and research are extremely important issues to work on during crisis. Fatima may be reached at Fatima.abbas174@gmail.com

Guest Authors Initiative:

The IIT Syrian student blog welcomes guest contributions from university students from Syria and around the globe.  To learn more about the Guest Authors Initiative, please contact Suhaib at suhayb4@gmail.com. 

Suhaib was born in Kamishli, Syria, and earned his bachelor’s degree in December 2014 from Illinois Institute of Technology’s Armour College of Engineering, with earlier studies at Aleppo University and Damascus University. Suhaib majored in Civil Engineering with a concentration in structural engineering. Upon graduation, he accepted a position as a project engineer working on projects throughout the state of Illinois; he lives in Springfield, Illinois. Suhaib previously worked with Jasmine Baladi Studio, an NGO that works to support Syrian children in refugee camps in Turkey. Suhaib regularly writes for the Syrian Students for a Better Future Blog.

 

 

 

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